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Overcoming Diabetes Stigmas and Stereotypes

  Every day, all around the world, people with diabetes feel outcast, different and alone. We can experience a deteriorating self-esteem based on our experience or perception of the way we are treated because we have diabetes. The way society treats people with diabetes may prevent us from actively practicing good diabetes self-management in our attempt to keep our diabetes a secret from friends, family, and the general public. The way our culture views diabetes is our unfortunate reality. The number of people with diabetes is expected to rise to 522 million in the next ten years. It is time we look at...

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Managing Diabetes Complications: Heart Disease

Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Heart or blood-vessel disease accounts for about 75% of all deaths for people with diabetes.1 High blood glucose levels can damage blood vessels, leading to cardiovascular complications, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries. In addition to risk factors you cannot control—such as heredity, age and gender—you can be at greater risk of heart problems from the following: High levels of blood fats, such as cholesterol and triglycerides High blood pressure Smoking Lack of...

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Managing Diabetes Complications: Kidney Disease

Kidneys filter your blood through millions of blood vessels and then dispose of body waste in your urine. Diabetes can damage these small blood vessels, making it hard for the kidneys to filter your waste. As a result, diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure. About 30% of people with type 1 diabetes and 10%–40% of those with type 2 diabetes will eventually have kidney disease, or nephropathy.1 Smoking, uncontrolled blood glucose, or high blood pressure, may increase your risk of kidney disease. Having a family member with kidney disease also increases the risk of developing kidney disease....

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Managing Diabetes Complications: Diabetes and Sexual Health

Diabetes can lead to difficulty with sexual performance for men and women. Issues Affecting Men Diabetes may cause nerve and artery damage, disrupting the blood flow needed for an erection. Men who have diabetes are 3 times more likely to experience this condition, known as erectile dysfunction or impotence.1 Experiencing erectile dysfunction is common and can be treated. A few factors that may increase the possibility of your experiencing impotence: Poorly controlled blood glucose High cholesterol High blood pressure Smoking Drinking...

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Managing Diabetes Complications: Nerve and Pain Damage

High blood glucose may damage the insulation of nerve cells and nerves may stop sending signals through the body the way they should. This is called neuropathy. Many people know that nerve damage can affect their hands and feet—that is why your healthcare professional should check the sensation in your feet at every visit. But nerve damage can affect every organ in the body—from your digestive tract to your bladder and sexual organs. Nerve damage can also affect your ability to feel the symptoms of low blood glucose.1 Who Is at Risk for Diabetic Neuropathy? About 60%–70% of people with diabetes...

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Managing Diabetes Complications: Dental and Gum Care

People with diabetes are more than twice as likely to have gum disease as people without diabetes. Both gum disease and gum infection are common complications of diabetes. In fact, nearly one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease.1 Regular dental checkups and good dental care at home can reduce dental problems. Types of Problems In addition to tooth decay and gum disease, you may experience these other problems that occur more often in people with diabetes: Thrush (oral candidiasis) is a fungal infection in the mouth that causes white or red spots on the...

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Managing Diabetes Complications: Skin Problem and Skin Care

Ways to keep skin healthy Healthy skin isn't just about how you look, and people with diabetes shouldn’t take it for granted. When there's too much glucose in your bloodstream, your body will try to flush it away, losing moisture in the process. As a result, people with diabetes tend to have dry skin. Much of a diabetes skin care regimen, then, revolves around replenishing that moisture. High blood glucose levels can affect your skin in several ways: loss of fluids (dehydration) due to more frequent urination can make your skin dry skin may become extra dry, itchy or cracked ...

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Managing diabetes for kids

A diagnosis of diabetes should not diminish your child’s quality of life. You and your child will have additional responsibilities over the years, but the added self-discipline may work in your child's favour. As a parent of an infant or toddler newly diagnosed with diabetes, your child’s diagnosis may affect you much more than it does your child. After all, your child is fully dependent upon you for all care, not just diabetes treatments. Even as your child begins walking and talking, diabetes will be a very small part of their world. Children live in the moment. The blood glucose test or injection that was so upsetting this...

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How and Why to Get a Good Night’s Sleep

Why sleep is important for people with diabetes When you are getting enough sleep, you may find that you have an easier time controlling your blood sugar. You’ll be more alert during the day, have more energy, less stress, and an overall better mindset for monitoring and managing your diabetes.  Consider what happens when you don’t get enough sleep. In addition to other things that may interfere with your sleep like schedule changes or stress, people with diabetes can have potential complications with sleep. Both high and low blood sugar levels can interrupt your sleep. People with type 2 diabetes...

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